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Islands

Anguilla

Anguilla, a small coral island of 91 km2, was discovered by the Spanish in the late 15th century. The island owes its name, which means "eel" in Latin, to its elongated shape. The native population, peaceful Arawak farmers, were wiped out by the colonizers.

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Antigua & Barbuda

The Caribbean nation of Antigua and Barbuda consists of the two eponymous islands and a number of small desert islands nearby. Among them is the island of Redonda, a protected natural park only 1 km² in land area.

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British Virgin Islands

The British Virgin Islands consist of 36 islands and only 16 of them are inhabited. The main islands are Tortola (55 sq.km.), Virgin Gorda and Jost Van Dyke.

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St. Barths

St. Barths, a tiny island famous for its sugar white beaches and celebrity holidaymakers, is located 200 km to the north of Guadeloupe. Until 2007, when it accomplished separation through a referendum, St. Barths was included in France’s overseas department of Guadeloupe.

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St. Kitts & Nevis

The two islands comprising the Federation of Saint Kitts and Nevis lie 3 km apart across a channel called The Narrows and are of volcanic origin. The country’s highest peak is Mount Liamuiga, an extinct volcano rising 1,156 m (3,792 ft) above sea level.

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St. Martin

Like most islands in the region, St. Martin was discovered by Christopher Columbus’ expedition in 1493. At first, the Spaniards showed no interest in the island, and so, shortly after, it became the bone of contention for the French and the Dutch, who ended up dividing it between their two territories. In 1648, they joined forces to keep the Spanish at bay and secured this Caribbean paradise for themselves.

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